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Charlie Chaplin in Vevey

La Fourchette Lovers of chocolate know that Vevey is the birthplace of milk chocolate. The Nestlé world headquarters thrives in this beautiful town surrounded by mountains and the calm lake waters of Lake Leman (Lake Geneva). These seats by the shore are definitely prime seating for capturing the beauty and serenity of the alpine scenery. Alimentarium Why is there a fork in the lake? La Fourchette was originally planted there for the celebration of the 10th anniversary of Alimentarium, a food museum founded by Nestlé. Though the Fork had become part of the seascape, Alimentarium didn’t have the legal permission to keep the 8-meter high utensil in the lake. It wasn't until 2008 when the canton of Vaud approved its permanent installation in Lake Leman. Jean Pierre Zaugg designed the Fork and George Favre made the stainless steel, 450 kg (992 lbs) work of art. La Grenette La Grenette (Granary) presides over the Grande Place of Vevey where the outdoor market is he
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Favorite U.S. Museums

Winslow Homer, Saco Bay, 1896, Oil on canvas.  The Clark Art Institute, 1955.5 The Clark Art Institute The Berkshires is one of the most beautiful places in the United States. Sleepy little towns snooze amidst lush vegetation and green hills. At Williamstown, you are immediately drawn by the calm and restful appeal of this town. This is why it is so surprising to find a museum of the caliber of the Clark Art Institute in this pastoral setting. Sterling Singer Clark, heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune and his wife, Francine Clary, founded the museum in 1950. Their collection of  French Impressionist and Academic paintings including works by Renoir, Degas, Gauguin and Van Gogh form the core collection of the museum together with their silver, porcelain, drawings and print acquisitions. The museum opened to the public in 1955. Sterling Clark also had an interest in American artists and collected the works of Winslow Homer and John Singer Sargent. The museum is at 225 South Street,

Iconic San Francisco Landmarks

   Painted Ladies, Steiner Street and Hayes Palace of Fine Arts, 3601 Lyon Street   Balcutha on Hyde Street Pier Crooked Street (Lombard Street) Bay Bridge St. Mary’s Cathedral, 1111 Gough Street Yes, it’s easy to leave your heart in San Francisco. With the fog rolling in over the hills, the call of the foghorn, the chill in the air that makes you want to cuddle and the views over the bay, it’s not easy to let go. I left my heart in San Francisco High on a hill, it calls to me To be where little cable cars Climb halfway to the stars The morning fog may chill the air I don’t care My love waits there in San Francisco Above the blue and windy sea When I come home to you San Francisco Your golden sun will shine on me. I left my heart in San Francisco, Tony Bennett, Columbia Records For more information about San Francisco, visit  https://www.visitcalifornia.com/places-to-visit/san-francisco/ Or  https://sfgov.org/visitors ***** Images by TravelswithCharie

Mission San Miguel Arcangél

Mission San Miguel Arcangél The plan for the three day Easter weekend getaway was to spend time on the beach. It was the antipode to months cooped up at home with only occasional trips to the supermarket. But on our way to Pismo Beach, we saw a sign that said Mission San Miguel. And it was only eleven minutes from our hotel in Paso Robles. It was the perfect place to spend Easter Sunday.  There are 21 Missions on the California Mission Historic Trail. From San Diego in the south to Sonoma in the north, these missions were established to convert Native Americans to Catholicism and expand Spain’s influence in Mexico (California was then part of Mexico).  Spain not only shaped the socio-cultural practices of Native Americans, they also influenced the architectural style of the era. The missions they built along the Camino Real (King’s Highway) beginning in 1769 through 1823 were originally built from adobe with arched columns, tiled roofs and corridors, fountains, and an interior courtyar

The Road to 193 with Bengt Enbuske

Bengt Enbuske in the northwestern mountains of Sweden Where and when was your first trip outside of your home country?   My first trip was to Norway in 1965 with my parents. My first solo trip was in 1972 to Gran Canarias. My first far away trip was in 1974 to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Actually, Finland was the first country I visited but it’s almost my home country. I live close to the Finnish border.  I have always been curious about the world and always had dreams to visit different places. And some places are “you must see it”. What is it about traveling that appeals to you the most? Experiencing the world, new countries, cultures, nature, peoples, amazing places and finding friendly people who are almost everywhere. Often in underdeveloped countries you find poorer people who are the most hospitable.   How many UN recognized sovereign countries have you visited? How many continents have you been to? I’ve been to all 193 UN countries (as of 2018) and 40 other countries from the Trave

Easter Weekend at Pismo Beach

Pismo Beach Pier After months of staying indoors with only an occasional getaway to the supermarket, it was a huge relief to take a short road trip to the coast. The weather was warm and the sky was clear. Though Pismo Beach was hopping with weekenders, we found parking a short distance from the beach. Most of the people on the pier and on the beach had their masks on.   The wooden pier is 1,200 feet long and extends out into the Pacific Ocean. It was renovated in 2020. There are a couple of vintage Airstream concession stands along its length offering snacks, drinks and souvenirs. The pier is connected to the plaza which has shops, cafés and a children’s playground.    Stairs lead down to the beach from both the north and south sides of the pier. It was fascinating to see the pylons supporting the pier. The pier has the best view of the surfers who, this late in the day, are still waiting patiently to ride the big wave. Sunset is that time of day when everyone stands quietly staring a

The Road to 193 with Hazel Borres Apuhin

Hazel Borres Apuhin skydiving in Dubai What inspired you to travel? I am often told that I got this itch for travel from my grandfather. I haven’t met him but he was once known as “the man with a sea fever” and was featured in a local newspaper in 1970’s when he and my two uncles tried to sail to America in a wooden outrigger. They were unsuccessful and found themselves on Taiwan shores, pretended they were fishermen that were carried out there by a storm. I was always inspired by my grandfather's stories growing up and I know he lived a great life and I thought to myself that I wanted my life to be well lived and different from others too. While in my teens, my mom used to tell us her experiences in the various countries she lived in and how different their culture, their food and people’s mindset in these countries were. This also fueled my curiosity and thought to myself that I will be traveling and seeing the world someday. What is it about traveling that appeals to you the mos