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Showing posts with the label Santiago Calatrava

University of Zurich Faculty Law Library

In what used to be the courtyard of the University of Zurich Faculty Law Library, Spanish architect, Santiago Calatrava, created the additional space the library needed in unconventional fashion. He built a modern wing in stark contrast to the staid building designed in 1908 by Hermann Fietz. Calatrava's design consists of 6 oval rings around an elongated glazed skylight which illuminates the galleries and courtyard. The rings are lined with maple wood that add a rich tone finish to the design and define its space between the glass dome and the white stone floor of the ground floor.

The glass domed copper roof floods the library with natural light.
Study spaces are formed around the balustrades on each gallery, taking advantage of natural light. 
A closer look at the graceful curve of the dome.
The galleries float above the courtyard.
Horizontal windows cut across the outer shell of the galleries.
Rather than cover up the original courtyard, Santiago Calatrava decided to keep it and tur…

Dublin Docklands Walk

The current Customs House is a reconstruction of the original structure designed by James Gandon in 1781 and opened in 1791. It was burned down in 1921 by the Irish Republican Army during the Irish War of Independence. The Customs House was originally built for the purpose of collecting customs duties from ships plying the Liffey River which is across the street. It became the headquarters of local government when the port was moved downriver and is currently the home of the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government.

Artistic Icons Define Buenos Aires

Obelisco
The Obelisco on Avenida 9 de Julio (9th of July Avenue) has been the symbol of Buenos Aires since 1936 when it was built to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the founding of the  city. (The 9th of July is the independence day of Argentina.) In the new millenium, two important architectural works were donated to the city and have become the defining icons of modern Buenos Aires.
Floralis Genérica
One of these, the Floralis Genérica, is a steel and aluminum floral sculpture designed and donated by local architect, Eduardo Catalano. The petals open in the morning and close at sunset except on certain days of the year when it remains open all day long. The Floralis is in the Palermo neighborhood on Plaza Naciones Unidas at Avenida Figueroa Alcorta, next door to the public law school which is an architectural destination on its own with its imposing neoclassical façade.
 Puente de la Mujer
The whitewashed Puente de la Mujer (Woman's Bridge)  soars over Dock 3 in the revita…