Skip to main content

When in Ivisan

"I've traveled far and wide to explore new horizons only to find that there's so much to see right here in my own backyard." TravelswithCharie

Basiao beach
A view of the islands from our cottage on Basiao beach. We ate a simple lunch of bangus (milkfish) and rice with the balut we bought in Dao and assorted pastries from Roxas City.

Islands of Pulo Gamay and Pulo Maba-ay
There's something to be said about heading to the beach on a weekday. We have this beautiful stretch of white sand to ourselves. All throughout lunch the siren song of the islands beckoned and we wanted to go island hopping but alas the rain caught up with us. All the more reason to come back. 

Oyster Farm
We managed a trip to the talaba (oyster) farm before the downpour. It was nice to see up close how they breed oysters. The old method is to suspend them from bamboo poles as you see here. The new method is to raise them in barrels which are partially sunk in the water. 

Ayagao beach
Another quiet white sand beach on a Thursday afternoon. This is what you call searenity. You can rent a cottage and bring your own food. There's a short zip line above the adjacent beach resort but it was not functioning when we visited. The drive to Ayagao is through a forested area past an orchid farm. It was refreshing to be surrounded by trees the shade of which dropped the temperature a notch and made for a pleasant ride.

Balaring 
We went to Balaring to distribute school supplies at the elementary school there. There's only a one lane road to get there which for the most part is unpaved and we had a rough ride. But we got to see this peaceful cove on our way to the school. I asked the driver to stop so I could take pictures of this hidden gem.

Christ the Redeemer
I had no idea that there is a statue of Christ the Redeemer in Ivisan. No one I know has ever mentioned it to me. But here it is, surrounded by a pastoral landscape and appearing very much like the statue of Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro. My friends joked that we didn't have to buy an airplane ticket to see this. We're blessed!

Coconut products
Thank goodness for friends who knew about this Coconut Cooperative where they sell coconut oil products. So I picked up cooking oil, massage oil with lemongrass, two kinds of body soap and two baby coconut trees. Having read the health benefits of coconut oil, I was happy to find a place where I could stock up on these items.

Ugoy ugoy
We stopped at Mayden Bakery and watched as they packaged monay bread at their factory at the back of the store. As it was merienda time, we bought a few of their treats like these ugoy ugoy which are nice and crispy and not too sweet. They're fresh off the oven.

Ivisan is a basket full of surprises. 

It's a 20-minute drive to Ivisan town proper (where Mayden Bakery and the Co-op are located) from Roxas City and a little bit more to the beaches. There are passenger vans departing from Roxas City to Ivisan where you can take a tricycle to the beaches or to Santo Rosario to see the statue of Christ the Redeemer.

*****

Images by travelswithcharie



Popular posts from this blog

8 Heritage Houses of Iloilo

Lizares Mansion The province of Iloilo on the island of Panay has a rich trove of heritage houses, left over from the sugar industry boom in the 19th century. Iloilo also had the largest port in the Philippines at that time which facilitated the export of sugar to foreign shores and deposited money in the hands of the sugar barons. The barons dropped their earnings into the acquisition of properties in Negros and the construction of beautiful homes in Iloilo, many of which are located in the vicinity of the Jaro Cathedral. The Lizares Mansion was built in 1937 by Don Emiliano Lizares for his wife, Concepcion Gamboa and five children. The family fled to safety when World War II broke out and the house was occupied by the Japanese military. The family returned to the house after the war but left once again after the demise of Don Emiliano. It was sold to the Dominican order in the 1960s and was converted in 1978 to a private school, Angelicum School. The mansion now houses the

The Art of Carlos Botong Francisco - Progress of Medicine in the Philippines

Pre-colonial period Pag-unlad ng Panggagamot sa Pilipinas (The Progress of Medicine in the Philippines) is a group of four large-scale paintings depicting healing practices in the Philippines from pre-colonial times to the modern period. Carlos Botong Francisco was commissioned in 1953 by  Dr. Agerico Sison who was then the director of Philippine General Hospital (PGH) together with   Dr. Eduardo Quisumbing of the National Museum, Dr. Florentino Herrera, Jr. and Dr. Constantino Manahan. These oil on canvas paintings measure 2.92 meters in height and 2.76 meters in width (9.71 ft x 8.92 ft) and were displayed at the main entrance hall of PGH for over five decades. Owing to its location, the artworks were in a state of "severe deterioration" at the beginning of the 21st century from exposure to heat, humidity, dirt, dust, smoke, insect stains, grime, termites and an oxidized synthetic resin used in an earlier restoration. These canvases were restored three times, the last was

Filipino Struggles in History - Carlos Botong Francisco

In 1968, Antonio Villegas (then Mayor of Manila), commissioned Carlos "Botong" Francisco to paint the history of Manila for Manila City Hall. The series of large scale paintings was called  Kasaysayan ng Maynila  (History of Manila).  The paintings deteriorated over time and no attempt was made to preserve these historical canvases until 2013 when Mayor Amado Lim sent them to the National Museum for extensive restoration. Four years later, in 2017, Mayor Joseph Ejercito Estrada and the Manila City Council signed an agreement with the National Museum to leave the paintings at the museum so they may reach a larger audience in exchange for museum grade reproductions to replace the originals. Kasaysayan ng Maynila was later renamed Filipino Struggles in History and is now on display at the Senate Hall of the National Museum . Carlos "Botong" Francisco died in March 1969, a few months after completing the paintings. He is one of the first Filipino modernists and