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Como


The town of Como is not just the gateway to the villages along Lake Como, it is a destination in itself. Surrounded by mountains and fronting the shores of Lake Como, it has a lot to offer its visitors. How about starting with a nice, cool prosecco at the Piazza Duomo as you watch the play of light against the walls of the Cathedral?

                        

The construction of the Cattedrale de Santa Maria Assunta or the Duomo di Como was began in 1396 and it was completed in 1770, nearly 4 centuries later. The front façade features a rose window flanked by statues of the illustrious Pliny the Elder and Pliny the Younger, both natives of Como.


As I was walking around town, I was struck by this architectural overhang, typical of medieval houses. Surprises abound in Como.


Another gem from the 12th century is this tower, Porta Torre, one of three remaining towers which once formed part of a wall that surrounded Como. Notice the four rows of arched windows which correspond to four internal storeys in this Romanesque structure.


Locals lucky enough to live by the shore get the best views of the lake. It must be hard to tear one's eyes away from the calming waters of Lake Como which measures 28.5 miles in length, 2.8 miles at its widest point and 414 meters in depth.


Some people take pride in keeping their water taxi in tiptop condition. Couldn't help but notice this sleek speedboat with its American flag. What a way to cruise the lake in style!

To get to Lake Como from Milan, take the train from Cadorna Station to Como Borghi. The fare is €4.55 one way (as of this writing) and it takes 45 minutes. It's a 10 minute walk to the lake from Borghi.

Como Borghi Train Station

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Images by Charie

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