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Geneva, Capital of Peace

In the city that boasts 1000 delights, there remains hundreds of discoveries to make. So each time I pass through Geneva, there's always something new to discover. Recently, I visited the European headquarters of the Palais des Nations where important discussions are held throughout the year to keep the fragile peace that binds our nations. 

Broken Chair, Geneva, Switzerland, sculpture
In front of the United Nations building is the wooden sculpture, Broken Chair by Daniel Berset, a Swiss sculptor. It is a reminder of the victims of landmines, cluster bombs and the ¨desperate cry of war torn populations¨. Rising to a height of 39 feet tall, it dwarfs visitors who pose by those long legs. Broken Chair was crafted by Louie Gèneve. 

Albert György, Melancholy, Geneva, sculpture
Melancholy is the most poignant sculpture I've ever seen. Nothing speaks of emptiness more than the gaping hole through which one can see the peaceful lake in the background. Melancholy was created by Romanian artist, Albert György, who experienced this void when his wife passed away. 

The Jet d'eau is the iconic symbol of Geneva. This fountain was originally created for the purpose of releasing water pressure into the air after the hydraulic pumping station on the Rhone River that powered factory machines was shut off at the end of the day. People were entranced and the valve releasing the water was relocated to its current central location.

The Brunswick Monument is a Neo-Gothic mausoleum built for Charles d'Este Guelph, the Duke of Brunswick. Expelled from his duchy in Germany in 1830, he made his fortune in Paris. He later moved to Geneva where he died in 1873 and left his considerable fortune to the city in exchange for a funeral befitting his stature and a monument to his name. The mausoleum is on Jardin des Alpes, a stone's throw from Lake Geneva.

Behind Cornavin Station is a quiet neighborhood with interesting architecture. These buildings are in the Renaissance style and look, there's even an Italian flag displayed on the balcony.

I was actually looking for some street art which this neighborhood had a few of but couldn't find the ones I had seen in pictures. Here's a sampler.

This is an innovative way to park as many bicycles and keep them off the streets.

Looking forward to more delightful discoveries in Geneva. 

Where to stay:
Ibis Styles
across the street from Cornavin Station
ibis.accor.com
I have stayed at this hotel a couple of times in the past year because of its proximity to Cornavin Station. It is also a short walk to the Old Town. Dining and shopping options nearby. The hotel serves a hearty breakfast which is included in the room rate. 

Note: Switzerland is an expensive destination. You pay much more for hotels and food.

*****

Images by TravelswithCharie


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