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Plane Etiquette

Your narrow seat and small legroom is your personal space for several hours (sometimes up to 12 or 15 excruciating hours). It does not help that your neighbor hogs all the space underneath the seat in front of you with his or her bag, shoes, discarded newspapers, blanket and what not. He/She has also taken the entire luggage compartment for wheeled luggage, laptop, coat, and gift bags with the logo of a famous store which all come down right after take-off and spread out on the seat between you and the fold out trays. But never mind that. That's a small inconvenience compared to the guy behind you who can't seem to decide what movie or video he wants to watch and keeps punching that screen which is right behind your headrest. Or you can be unlucky enough to sit in front of a kid who keeps kicking your seat or that man who has his knees locked to your seatback so you cannot recline your seat. Don't even mention the smell when someone can't wait to go to the lavatory and passes gas in your general vicinity. And you thought all that is over when the plane lands but no! Watch out for the passenger who is super eager to get out of the plane and pulls out his heavy carry-on from the compartment right above your head. Yes, I've been a victim of an assault in an airplane. And the man didn't even apologize though he saw he had hit me on the head with his vicious weapon.

P.S. I forgot to mention the time when I flew from SFO to Seoul and a man with long legs wearing no socks decided to recline across 3 seats with his feet right next to me. His toenails were long and black. Need I say more?

For more laughs and indignation, check out Delta's Planeguage site which features videos on Plane Etiquette. Learn about Planeguage before you fly.

http://blog.delta.com/2007/10/31/planeguage-language-of-traveling-by-plane/

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